Representative Todd Porter

Representative Todd Porter

Joined Caucus:
2013

Representing
North Dakota

Party
Republican

Website
www.legis.nd.gov/assembly/63-2013/members/house/representative-todd-porter

First elected to the North Dakota State Assembly in 1998, Representative Todd Porter currently serves the state’s 34th District. As Chairman of the Energy and Natural Resources House Standing Committee, Representative Porter promotes pro-sportsmen’s legislation at the state capitol in Bismark, ND. In 2013, he joined the North Dakota Legislative Sportsmen’s Caucus as Caucus Co-Chair.

As a native North Dakota resident, Representative Porter grew up surrounded by the state’s rich sporting heritage. He continues to be an avid hunter and angler, and takes this passion for sportsmen’s issues with him to the State Assembly.

In 2015, Representative Porter introduced HB 1409, a bill which amended the funding and purpose of the North Dakota Outdoor Heritage Fund. The Outdoor Heritage Fund now receives eight percent, instead of the previous four percent, of the gross oil and gas production tax. The tax revenues allocated to the Outdoor Heritage Fund are then directed to fund grants that enhance, improve, conserve, or restore wildlife and aquatic habitats on public and private lands. North Dakota’s sportsmen and women applauded the passage of this bill, as it provides more funding to grant projects that improve wildlife habitat and provide greater access to public and private lands for recreational purposes.

Representative Porter received a lifetime ‘A+’ rating from the National Rifle Association for his commitment to sportsmen’s issues and strong defense of Second Amendment rights. He is also an active member of Pheasants Forever and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. 

North Dakota’s is home to more than 116,000 hunters and anglers who contribute over $222 million to the state economy each year and support almost 3,500 jobs statewide. 


Your opinion counts

Recently, Virginia has proposed legislation that would make the punishment for poaching, in their state, a 1-5 year prison sentence through HB-449. Poaching undermines the social acceptance of hunters, jobs, recreation, local and state economies, and conservation efforts. How should poachers be punished?

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