Massachusetts: MassWildlife Hosts Final Listening Session on Coyote Contests

Contact: Joe Mullin, New England States Coordinator

On June 18, the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (MassWildlife) hosted its final public listening session on coyote hunting contests and species population management practices at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy in Buzzards Bay.

The event primarily served the purpose of allowing MassWildlife the opportunity to gather public comments for deliberation by the MassWildlife Board. The Board is tasked with managing and protecting “the wildlife of the Commonwealth as an essential public natural resource for the use and enjoyment of all citizens who hunt, fish, trap, and enjoy nature study and observation.” The Board will be able to use the information and opinions gathered through this public hearing to advise on any regulatory changes to the hunting of coyotes within the Commonwealth, if it so chooses.

Coyote hunting contests have been a popular practice in southeastern Massachusetts, and participants are still required to abide by state fish and wildlife regulations. The future of coyote hunting contests will be a topic of discussion for the MassWildlife Board to consider in the near future.

As of right now, the Board’s next scheduled meeting is set for July 17, though the agenda has not yet been finalized. The meeting will be open for public attendance, though the Board will solely be addressed by MassWildlife staff on the topic of continuing, preventing, or adjusting the current coyote hunting contest tradition. Depending on the outcome of this Board meeting, there may be either a more formal notice and comment period, or ultimately no action at all.

States Involved

Share this page

Your opinion counts

Recently, Virginia has proposed legislation that would make the punishment for poaching, in their state, a 1-5 year prison sentence through HB-449. Poaching undermines the social acceptance of hunters, jobs, recreation, local and state economies, and conservation efforts. How should poachers be punished?

Vote Here
Get Involved

We work hard to educate elected officials about issues important to you, but we can't do it alone. Find out how you can get involved and support CSF.

Read More